How To Get A Stronger Neck?

How To Get A Stronger Neck?

According to the statistics, most men fancy a thicker neck over a skinnier one. Why is that? When an athlete or a bodybuilder gains mass and bulks up, their neck appears to be disproportionate compared to the rest of the body. Thus, the reason behind why scraggy necks don’t get the same affection as their girthy counterpart.

Now, how thick, you may wonder? The average circumference of a male’s neck is fifteen inches. The majority prefers to raise that measurement to at least eighteen or nineteen inches. Many simply claim the look of a bigger neck is more attractive and sometimes big necks even appear to be intimidating.

If you fall under the category of people who are not blessed with a bigger neck and have your Google history littered with countless 'how to get a bigger neck' articles that just don't work, then fear not, you have come to the right place.

There are plenty of routines designed for how to drive your dreams of having a bigger, muscular neck to becoming a reality! 

Anatomy Of Your Neck Muscles

It is always best to know what you affect in your body before you decide to alter it. Below is the anatomy of your neck muscles and related body parts and ways of how you can safely reshape it.

Muscles of the Neck

Our neck is occupied by muscles that enable it to be flexed, twisted, turned, and extended. Exercising helps in the bulking up of the neck, but the results are more prominent because of two major muscles; (upper) trapezius muscle and sternocleidomastoid muscle.

Your nape’s appearance is heavily dependent on the upper traps (the uppermost fibers of the trapezius muscle).

This kind of neck muscle is responsible for allowing us to shrug our shoulders, which means it can be easily trained by compound lifts (deadlifts, loaded carries, overhead presses, and lateral presses). No dedicated lifts or special kind of exercise is required, all you need to do is build muscles overall for thoroughly trained upper traps.

spinal erectors

Next, we have erector spinae, also known as spinal erectors. These short muscles span over a couple of vertebrae (backbone/ spine). They are connected so high up that they can only be trained by lifts that force the head to be driven under the load (for example; neck extensions and neck bridges).

Strengthening the spinal erectors will frame the neck to appear muscular from the left or right profile, but they aren't truly ‘thicker’ or 'bigger'. They simply create an illusion of a 'thick neck'.

The only muscles that influence the width and strength of our neck are upper trapezius muscles and sternocleidomastoid muscles.

The sternocleidomastoid muscles are neck ‘flexors’, meaning that they’re trained by lifts that drives the head forward under load, such as neck curls. 

The neck muscles can bend and twist our necks from side to side, so doing these side raises can certainly help to bulk them up. However, you can skip side raises and instead just do neck curls as the same muscles are trained by just them too.

Do Not Forget The Posture!

It is also very important to take care of your posture!

What contributes to a poor posture? Poor posture often stems from modern-day habits such as working in front of a computer, slouching on a couch while watching TV, or looking down at a smartphone.

Poor posture could also be due to many hours spent carrying heavy objects (like equipment at work, grocery bags, or a heavy bag/ purse).

All of these activities can force or pressurize you to stoop or bring your shoulders forward. 
This overstretches and weakens the muscles in the back of your shoulders, and shortens the muscles in the front of your shoulders and in your chest. 

Gravity then works on those strained muscles and pulls them down, making them too weak to be pulled back up.

If the core muscles in your back and abdomen have grown weak from inactivity that can also cause you to lean forward. Those muscles are crucial to lifting your frame and keeping you upright.

Another reason behind your poor posture could be broken bones. People with brittle bones (osteoporosis) may experience compression fractures when the bones in the back (vertebrae) aren't strong enough to support the load placed on them. The bone collapses on the front side, the part closest to the chest.

how to fix your posture

As collapsed vertebrae stack up, the spine becomes rounded and bends forward, a condition called dowager's hump.

The key to fixing poor posture is strengthening and stretching the muscles in the upper back, chest, and core.

(Suggested product to help you fix your posture: Ab Straps and/ or Neck Head Harness)

Poor posture can cause neck pain by straining muscles and ligaments that support the neck, resulting in injury over time. You can't get the strong neck that you fancy with a crooked base, can you? So, keep yourself and your neck in check by monitoring your neck's position- don't slant it forward and place the head in front of the shoulders.

You'll also have to work on your posture in everyday activities. Cut down on activities that have led to poor posture, too. Take breaks from the computer and TV time, and exercise more.

Fix your posture first before you fix your neck training exercises to achieve quicker results!

To sum it up, start with a perfect posture. A good neck bulking routine is going to include some heavy compound lifts to train our fleshy upper traps, some extra neck extensions to ensure that each and every fiber is getting polished, and then a lot of neck curling to bulk up the sternocleidomastoid muscles.

Above we brushed over the framework of our neck and then briefly discussed how little movements contribute to your neck’s appearance. Keep in mind that despite the upper traps being the biggest neck muscles, they don’t make it thicker.

To achieve a broader neck, you will need to incorporate dedicated strength training into your routine.

Exercises To Help You Accomplish Your Goal

Proceed with caution; it should go without saying that you should never suddenly put your body through strenuous activities. You don’t expect a fetus to start walking the moment they are born, do you? The same goes for you and your body.

Always ease into your training, don’t dive in precipitously.  Start easy and gradually work your way up.

If you notice that your neck feels a little bit stiff at first, you can avoid it by bodyweight neck stretches before and after your workout and on rest days too. You can also implement warm-up sets to prepare before getting started.

Now you are ready for your actual training.

Below, you will find exercises that you can perform at your local gym or even at your home! Neck exercises are very versatile which allows the athlete to get a muscular neck with or without the help of 'required' equipment.

1. Neck Curls

Neck curls are crucial to your neck training as they are efficient and work on the sternocleidomastoid muscles that give us a thicker neck when viewed from the front.

neck curls

Using weights:

Start off by wearing some sort of hat to create a barrier between the weight plate and your forehead to prevent bruises and ridges.

Place the plate on your forehead and move your chin towards the upper chest. Try to keep your arms and abs disengaged and focus only on your neck. You should feel intense contractions in the neck and lactic acid building up; otherwise, you’re doing it wrong.        

Without using weights:

Start off by laying down flat on your back. Then from there, you want to make sure your shoulders are a little bit curled up and that your neck is not touching the ground. You can use a bench if you have one, but it is not necessary.

Once you’re in the proper position, you want to go back until your head goes as far as it can while keeping your neck straight. Then from there, curl your chin in so that you're doing a full proper neck curl. 

2. Neck Extension

In addition to doing neck curls, you also want to train the spinal erectors and upper traps running along the back of our necks.

Using weights:

Wear a thick hat to prevent bruising on the back of your head. Then place the weight plate on the back of your head and use both hands to support it on either side. Remember to keep your elbows tucked in.

Before starting, your neck should be in a flexed position. You should be looking down such that you can see the foot of the bench beneath you. Inhale before initiation.

Once settled, initiate the upward movement by lifting your head and arms together. Remember to keep all the tension in your neck. Exhale during the concentric movement. Your head should be just slightly above the shoulders, not craned or over-extended up.

Your uppermost part of the back may feel like it is working at the top of the rep. This is normal. Make sure to not overextend and keep your lower rib cage in contact with the bench at all times. Lower your head at a controlled pace and then repeat.        

Without using weights:

 Lie on your stomach, but don't lay flat on your stomach. Keep your upper chest and your shoulders off the ground. Then from there maintain that position and bring your chin down slow then extend back up all the way.

3. Neck Side Raises

neck side raises

These are not necessary, but the neck side raises provide variation. To do these, all you have to do is lie on a bench, place the weight on your head, and flex your neck sideways.

4. Neck Flexion

Head and Neck Movements

For this exercise, stand up tall with a straight spine and erect body. Slowly flex your head downward. Try to bring your chin in so it may touch your chest. Keep your mouth closed. Return to the starting position and carry on with the rest of the reps (three sets of twelve reps for each exercise).

5. Neck Lateral Flexion

neck lateral flexion

This exercise can also be done without equipment. If you wish to increase the difficulty level, you can do so by using a resistance band, a partner, or a four-way neck machine.

To start off, stand with the correct posture and look straight ahead. Turn your head so it leans to the other end and bring your ear toward your shoulder. Make sure you keep your shoulders flat throughout the exercise. Do not lift them. Return to the starting position and repeat on the opposite side.

Continue with the same reps as the previous exercise.

Possible Risks Proposed By Neck Exercises

neck pain

One should know that nothing is free of risks before they venture into it. Exceeding certain limitations may end up doing more harm than good. As said before, please proceed with caution.

Overworking or misusing your neck muscles can lead to pain and injury. This can be caused by exhausted muscles, worn joints, and nerve constriction. Make sure the exercises don’t cause or augment pain. If something doesn’t feel right, discontinue the exercise/exercises. The neck pain is NOT worth it.

Other Benefits

Besides aesthetics, there are a number of reasons you’d want to get a thicker neck. Practicing exercises for a thicker neck will minimize pain caused by stresses like sitting at a work desk all day or practicing tackles. Even those with chronic neck pain can benefit from learning how to get a stronger neck.

Doing neck workout to maintain neck strength not only lessens neck tightness but also increases its flexibility. By doing thick neck exercises, you slowly expand your range of motion, get an erect spine that fixes your posture, promotes fitness and contact sports, healthy life, and of course, you get a thicker neck!

In conclusion, it’s well worth researching how to get a strong neck.

The Takeaway

  • Try to keep your head up and erect so you have a good posture as a base for the neck training.
  • Know what impact the aforementioned neck exercises may have on your neck/body and consider all the risks.
  • Consult your trainer/physician/doctor before neck training for a big neck.
  • Don't jump in headfirst. Ease into the exercise/exercises to avoid neck pain.
  • Incorporate a limited number of reps and sets in your strength gaining exercise routine.
  • DO NOT RUSH THE PROCESS. Take things at a slow pace and allow it to happen naturally.
  • Stay consistent with your exercise regimen to attain neck strength faster.
  • Don't get disheartened if your 'thick neck' doesn't make an appearance, it is just shy. Give it some time and it would eventually show up!

I hope this article was able to provide you with some insight on how to get an aesthetically pleasing, thicker, stronger, and bigger neck. All you need is patience, practice, and hard work to attain the physique you have always desired!

Good luck with your neck training that will surely be a boost to your strength training!

 

Frequently Asked Questions

1. How can I get a thick neck?

Exercises for increasing the size of your neck:

  • Neck Curls: Perform three sets, twenty reps.
  • Neck Extension: Perform three sets, twenty reps.
  • Neck Side Raises: Perform three sets, twenty reps. Or perform three sets, thirty-three reps.
  • Neck Flexion: Perform three sets, twelve reps.
  • Neck Lateral Flexion: Perform three sets, twelve reps.

You can change the number of reps or sets as you see fit to align it with the rest of your workout regime.

2. How can I make my neck bigger at home?

Don't have the luxury of any gyms nearby? These neck exercises got you covered!

Exercises to incorporate into your workout routine at the comfort of your home:

Neck Curls

Start off by laying down flat on your back. Then, you want to ensure your shoulders are a little bit curled up and that your neck is above the ground. Once in the proper position, you want to go back until your head goes as far as it can while keeping your neck straight. Then curl your chin in so that you're doing a full proper neck curl.

Neck Flexion

Stand up tall with a straight spine and erect body. Slowly flex your head downward. Try to bring your chin in so it may touch your chest. Keep your mouth closed. Return to the starting position and carry on with the rest of the reps.

Neck Lateral Flexion

To start off, stand with the correct posture and look straight ahead. Turn your head so it leans to the other end and bring your ear toward your shoulder. Make sure you keep your shoulders flat throughout the exercise.

Do not lift them. Return to the starting position and repeat on the opposite side. Continue with the same reps as before for neck flexion.     

Neck Extensions

Lie on your stomach, but don't lay flat on your stomach. Keep your upper chest and your shoulders off the ground. Then from there maintain that position and bring your chin down slow then extend back up all the way.

3. How can I get a muscular neck fast?

There is never a hard and fast method when it comes to altering your body or appearance (unless you are considering the surgeries that would cost you an arm and a leg).

Take it slow and go at your own tempo. You can increase the intensity and duration of your neck muscle training as you progress.

As for when you will be able to see noticeable results, it may take a few weeks or months, depending on your strength training. In some cases, people may start to feel the results before they become apparent.

This can depend on factors such as your fitness level, body size, and/ or body fat percentage. The duration and intensity of your neck exercises, as well as consistency, can also affect results.

4. What's the best product on the market to get a thick neck?

Neck Harness- DMoose Fitness

To be able to perform any aforementioned exercise with ease, I would like to present DMoose Fitness' neck harness! This neck harness is the perfect fit if you are starting off with an unattended posture.

It is very beneficial as it can be used for strengthening the neck, shoulders, and chest muscles; which means you are fixing your posture and simultaneously working for a thick neck and healthier body.

Shop now at Neck Head Harness to procure thick neck or head over to DMoose for more flawless equipment, made with quality material that promises a helping hand in getting fit, just for you!


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